Registration Announcements

Past Registration Announcements

Current Registration Announcement

Spring 2022

 

 

THE UNIVERSITY RESERVES THE RIGHT TO REVISE

ANY INFORMATION LISTED IN THIS TIMETABLE OF CLASSES

 

The University of Tennessee Space Institute

Spring 2022 Course Listings

AEROSPACE ENGINEERING
AVIATION SYSTEMS
BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING
ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT
INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
MATHEMATICS
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
PHYSICS

 

AEROSPACE ENGINEERING

AE 500 Master’s Thesis (1-15)
SEC. 001 CRN 33731 Abedi
002 CRN 33732 Kreth
003 CRN 33733 Moeller
004 CRN 33734 Schmisseur
005 CRN 33735 Zhang

Grading Restriction: P/NP only.
Repeatability: May be repeated.
Credit Level Restriction: Graduate credit only.
Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – graduate.


AE 502 Registration for Use of Facilities (1-15)
SEC. 002 CRN 23959 Moeller

Required for the student not otherwise registered during any semester when student uses university facilities and/or faculty time before degree is completed.
Grading Restriction: Satisfactory/No Credit grading only.
Repeatability: May be repeated.
Credit Restriction: May not be used toward degree requirements.
Credit Level Restriction: Graduate credit only.
Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – graduate


AE 512 Viscous Flow (3)
SEC. 001 CRN 23960
TEXT: Viscous Fluid Flow; Frank M. White; McGraw Hill; 3rd Edition; ISBN 0072402318
TIME: Tuesday & Thursday 2:40 – 3:55 E-113
PROF: Dr. Mark Gragston

Derivation of fundamental equations of compressible viscous flow; boundary conditions for viscous heat-conducting flow; exact solutions for Newtonian viscous flow (Navier-Stokes) equations for special cases; similarity solutions. Thermal boundary layers, stability of laminar flows, transition to turbulence, 2-D turbulent boundary layer equations. Incompressible-turbulent mean flow, and compressible boundary layer flow.


Registration Permission: Consent of instructor.

AE 516 Data Measurement and Analysis (3)
SEC. 001 CRN 34284 (Same as ME 516 001 CRN 34868)
TEXT: Random Data: Analysis and Measurement Procedures; Julius S. Bendat and Allan G. Piersol;
Wiley; 4th Ed.; ISBN 978-0-470-24877-5
TIME: Monday & Wednesday 8:50 – 10:05 E-111
PROF: Dr. Phil Kreth

Various tools and techniques used in the analysis of random data. Data classification; statistics and probability; spectral and correlation functions; data acquisition fundamentals; input-output system models; and an introduction to modern data analysis procedures.
Cross-listed: (Same as: Mechanical Engineering 516.)
(DE) Prerequisite(s): Undergrad degree in engineering. Consent of instructor.
Recommended Background: Logic-based programming knowledge (preferably within MATLAB) and some laboratory research.


AE 566 Electric Propulsion (3)
SEC. 001 CRN 28542
TEXT: Physics of Electric Propulsion (textbook is available from Amazon.com); Robert G. Jahn;
Dover Publications; ISBN 10:0486450406; 13: 978-0486450407
TIME: Monday & Thursday 1:00 – 2:15 E-113
PROF: Dr. Trevor Moeller

Engineering concepts of electric propulsion and its application to modern satellites and deep space probes. Topics include physical principles, practical designs, and performance levels of electrically-powered space propulsion thrusters including: ion engines; pulsed and steady-state (fixed field) plasma and MHD thrusters, including Hall Thrusters, and others.
Recommended Background: Rocket propulsion.
Registration Permission: Consent of Instructor.


AE 590 Selected Engineering Problems (2-6)
SEC. 001 CRN 23965 Abedi
002 CRN 33737 Kreth
003 CRN 33738 Moeller
004 CRN 33739 Schmisseur
005 CRN 33740 Zhang

Repeatability: May be repeated. Maximum 6 hours.
Comment(s): Enrollment limited to students in problems option.
Registration Permission: Consent of advisor.


AE 599 Special Topics: Aerospace Ground Test Simulations and Facilities (3)
SEC. 001 CRN 23969 (Same as ME 599 002 CRN 26621)
TEXT: No Textbook – Instructor Notes Only
TIME: Monday & Wednesday 10:30 – 11:45 E-111
PROF: Dr. Milt Davis

• Provide a Fundamental Understanding of Aerospace Ground Test Simulation and Facilities
• How Ground Testing Provides Accurate Engineering Information
• Application of GT Information to Aerospace System
• Applicable Analysis Techniques
• Suitable Measurement Systems
Repeatability: May be repeated. Maximum 6 hours.


AE 599 Special Topics: Combustion II – Combustion and Propulsion (3)
SEC. 003 CRN 26620 (Same as ME 599 013 CRN 27651)
TEXT: Stabilization and Dynamics of Premixed Swirling Flames; 1st Edition; Paul Palies;
July 2020; Available electronically at the library.
TIME: Tuesday & Thursday 10:30 – 11:45 E-113
PROF: Dr. Paul Palies

This course follows Combustion I course and focuses on combustion dynamics and unsteady combustion process in gas turbine engines for commercial aviation. The goal is to describe the fundamentals of combustion processes at work in these propulsion systems including turbulent combustion and combustion instability. A major emphasis is on flame stabilization and combustion dynamics. Flame stabilization includes non-reacting flow processes and chemical reactions complexities associated to the flame front which are described. Combustion dynamics include phenomenon such as flashback, combustion oscillation, and blowoff. Elements of analytical, computational modeling and experimental measurements in the field are introduced and discussed. The operation and principles of gas turbines engines are also described. Finally, the perspective for research and development are outlined and include clean propulsion, sustainable aviation fuel, premixed combustion, and hydrogen combustion. Some of the material presented and this course are also relevant to other combustion and propulsion systems and specifics (fighter aircraft and rocket engines…) and will be discussed too.
This is a three-credit hour course. Combustion I is recommended, but not required.
Repeatability: May be repeated. Maximum 6 hours.


AE 599 Special Topics: Introduction to Uncertainty Quantification (3)
SEC. 005 CRN 25163 (Same as ME 599 006 CRN 25765)
TEXT: Measurement Uncertainty, Methods and Applications; Ronald Dieck; International Society of Automation; 5th Edition; ISBN-10 1941546943, ISBN-13 978-1941546949
TIME: Tuesday & Thursday 10:30 – 11:45 E-110
PROF: Dr. Ragini Acharya

With the increasing complexity and more demanding requirements for engineered systems, it has become vital to include Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) in engineering analysis. This course will cover uncertainty identification and quantification arising from sources like measurement inaccuracies, material properties, boundary and initial conditions, and modeling approximations, numerical errors in the computational fluid dynamics based workflow including validation with experimental data, introduces forward and inverse propagation of uncertainty and uncertainty quantification methods, discuss potential implementations on use case studies to demonstrate the benefits of going beyond deterministic analysis.
The competitive benefits of UQ include reduced development time and cost, improved designs, better understanding of risk, and quantifiable confidence in analysis results and engineering decisions. Unfortunately, there are obstacles and technical challenges which can prevent organizations from utilizing UQ methods and techniques in their engineering practice. This graduate course will enable students to be prepared for these technical challenges.
Repeatability: May be repeated. Maximum 6 hours.


AE 599 Special Topics: Mathematical Methods in Physics I (3)
SEC. 006 CRN 24962 (Same as BME 005 CRN 25957 and ME 599 015 CRN 28672)
TEXT: Mathematical Methods for Physicists; Arfken et al; Academic Press; 2013
TIME: TBD
PROF: Dr. Christian Parigger

Linear vector spaces, matrices, tensors, curvilinear coordinates, functions of a complex variable, partial differential equations and boundary value problems, Green’s functions, integral transforms, integral equations, spherical harmonics, Bessel functions, calculus of variations.
Recommended Background: Advanced calculus and differential equations.
Repeatability: May be repeated. Maximum 6 hours.
AE 600 Doctoral Research/Dissertation (3-15)
SEC. 010 CRN 23980 Abedi
013 CRN 23983 Kreth
015 CRN 25295 Moeller
016 CRN 33741 Schmisseur
017 CRN 33786 Zhang

Grading Restriction: P/NP only.
Repeatability: May be repeated.
Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – graduate.


AE 601 Doctoral Research Methodology (3)
SEC. 002 CRN 28551
TEXT: TBD
TIME: TBD
PROF: Dr. Jeffrey Reinbolt

Methods of planning and conducting original research and proposal writing.
Grading Restriction: Satisfactory/No Credit grading only.
Repeatability: Maximum 6 hours. May be repeated once.
Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – graduate / doctoral students.
Registration Permission: Departmental approval.


AE 681 Advanced Viscous Flow Theory (3)
SEC. 001 CRN 28674
TEXT: TBD
TIME: Monday & Wednesday 12:10 – 1:25 E-110
PROF: Dr. James Coder

Critical review of significance to governing equations. Nature of boundary layer approximation as singular perturbation problem. Uniqueness and existence of solutions. Applications of group theory. Special problem areas of interest to students.
(DE) Prerequisite(s): 512, continuum mechanics, and Mathematics 562.
Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – graduate.


AE 690 Selected Topics: Optical and Laser Methods in Aerodynamic Measurements (3)
SEC. 004 CRN 26835
TEXT: No Textbook Required
TIME: Monday & Wednesday 2:40 – 3:55 Online
PROF: Dr. Mark Gragston

Optics and optical measurements play an increasingly important role in various aspects of modern engineering, such as the design of sensors for automation, instrumentation for biomedical diagnostics, and for precise measurements of high-speed gas flows in wind tunnels. This course aims to provide basic knowledge of light, optical components, lasers, and the use of light for engineering measurements.
Repeatability: May be repeated. Maximum 9 hours.
Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – graduate.
Registration Permission: Consent of instructor.


AVIATION SYSTEMS

 

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING

BME 500 Master’s Thesis (1-15)
SEC. 012 CRN 25804 Johnson

Grading Restriction: P/NP only.
Repeatability: May be repeated.
Credit Level Restriction: Graduate credit only.
Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – graduate.

BME 529 Applications of Linear Algebra in Engineering Systems (3)
SEC. 001 CRN 24061 (Video Recorded)
TEXT: Advanced Linear Algebra for Engineers with MATLAB; Sohail A. Dianat and Eli S. Saber;
CRC Press; Latest Edition; ISBN 978-1-4200-9523-4
TIME: Tuesday & Thursday 8:50 – 10:05 E-111
PROF: Dr. Monty Smith

Fundamental concepts of linear algebra to problems in engineering systems: steady state and dynamic systems. Geometric and physical interpretations of relevant concepts: least square problems, LU, QR, and SVD decompositions of system matrix, eigenvalue problems, and similarity transformations in solving difference and differential equations; numerical stability aspects of various algorithms; application of linear algebra concepts in control and optimization studies; introduction to linear programming. Computer projects.

Methods of linear algebra with application to engineering problems. Systems of linear equations: matrix-vector notation, solutions to linear equations, matrix determinants, matrix inversion, Cramer’s rule, LU matrix decomposition. Vector spaces: spanning sets, vector norms, orthogonality, QR matrix decomposition, linear transformations. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors: characteristic polynomials, modal matrices, singular value decomposition. The Cayley-Hamilton theorem: matrix polynomials, functions of matrices, solutions to systems of differential and difference equations. Optimization: least-squares and weighted least-squares methods.

Cross-listed: (Same as Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering 529; Civil Engineering 529, Electrical and Computer Engineering 529; Environmental Engineering 529; Industrial Engineering 529; Materials Science and Engineering 529; Mechanical Engineering 529; Nuclear Engineering 529).
Comment(s): Graduate standing or consent of instructor required.


BME 560 Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine (3)
SEC. 002 CRN 33260
TEXT: TBD
TIME: Tuesday & Thursday 1:50 – 3:05 Online
PROF: Dr. Sara Hanrahan

Develop an understanding of cell-cell interactions and the role of the extracellular matrix in the structure and function of normal and pathological tissues. Topics include the harvesting of stem cells from specific tissues, the use of artificial and natural scaffolds in three-dimensional tissue culture, and the role of maintaining the stem cell state in culture.
(DE) Prerequisite(s): 503, 511, 521.

BME 588 Cell and Tissue-Biomaterials Interaction (3)
SEC. 003 CRN 33788
TEXT: TBD
TIME: Tuesday & Thursday 10:30 – 11:45 Online
PROF: Dr. Sara Hanrahan

Study of the fundamental principles involved in materials / cell and tissue interactions. Students will learn the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms in host response to biomaterials. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of biomaterials/neuronal cells and tissue interactions into the design of neural implants (sensors, scaffolds, and therapeutics delivery modalities, etc.). Additional research paper assignments will be given to graduate students registered for this course.
Recommended Background: BME 474.
Comment(s): Prior knowledge may satisfy prerequisites, with consent of instructor.


BME 590 Selected Engineering Problems (2-6)
SEC. 001 CRN 26717 Johnson

Repeatability: May be repeated. Maximum 6 hours.
Comment(s): Enrollment limited to students in problems option.
Registration Permission: Consent of advisor.


BME 599 Special Topics: Mathematical Methods in Physics I (3)
SEC. 005 CRN 25957 (Same as AE 599 006 CRN 24962 and ME 599 015 CRN 28672)
TEXT: Mathematical Methods for Physicists; Arfken et al; Academic Press; 2013
TIME: TBD
PROF: Dr. Christian Parigger

Linear vector spaces, matrices, tensors, curvilinear coordinates, functions of a complex variable, partial differential equations and boundary value problems, Green’s functions, integral transforms, integral equations, spherical harmonics, Bessel functions, calculus of variations.
Recommended Background: Advanced calculus and differential equations.
Repeatability: May be repeated. Maximum 6 hours.


BME 599 Special Topics: Neuroscience (3)
SEC. 007 CRN 28695
TEXT: TBD
TIME: Tuesday & Thursday 7:10 – 8:25 Online
PROF: Dr. Sara Hanrahan

Repeatability: May be repeated. Maximum 12 hours.
Registration Permission: Consent of instructor.


BME 600 Doctoral Research/Dissertation (3-15)
SEC. 011 CRN 25805 Johnson

Grading Restriction: P/NP only.
Repeatability: May be repeated.
Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – graduate.


BME 601 Doctoral Research Methodology (3)
SEC. 002 CRN 28552
TEXT: TBD
TIME: TBD
PROF: Dr. Jeffrey Reinbolt

Intensive, individualized experience in reviewing literature, evaluating experimental or theoretical methods, planning a research project, and presenting research project plans orally and in writing.
Grading Restriction: Satisfactory/No Credit grading only.
Repeatability: Maximum 6 hours. May be repeated once.
Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – graduate. PhD students only.
Registration Permission: Consent of instructor.


BME 679 Mechanics for Dental Materials (3)
SEC. 001 CRN 34051
TEXT: Materials Science for Dentistry; B. W. Darvell; 9th Edition;
TIME: Monday, Wednesday & Friday 12:00 – 12:50 Zoom
PROF: Dr. Jackie Johnson

Dental Materials have some of the most exacting and varied requirements for mechanical strength. Uses of dental materials include fillings, crowns, bridges, implants, root canals, impressions and many others. The course will cover mechanical testing, such as deformation, strength testing, impact and creep; rheology, such as elasticity, flow and fillers; surfaces – wetting, bonding, adhesives and etching; Corrosion – basic considerations, passive metals and deliberate corrosion; casting – dimensional considerations and defects. There will also be a modeling component.
(DE) Prerequisite(s): Mechanical Engineering 524, 530, or 559.
Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – graduate.


ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT

 

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING

IE 500 Master’s Thesis (1-15)
SEC. 010 CRN 21682 Simonton UT Space Institute Campus
011 CRN 25080 Yu UT Space Institute Campus
016 CRN 33706 Yu Distance Education Campus

Grading Restriction: P/NP only.
Repeatability: May be repeated.
Credit Level Restriction: Graduate credit only.
Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – graduate.


IE 501 Design Project (1-3)
SEC. 016 CRN 34556 Tolk UT Space Institute Campus
017 CRN 34557 Tolk UT Distance Education Campus

Grading Restriction: Satisfactory/No Credit grading only.
Repeatability: May be repeated. Maximum 6 hours.
Comment(s): Enrollment limited to industrial engineering students in non-thesis option.
Credit Level Restriction: Graduate credit only.
Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – graduate.


IE 502 Registration for Use of Facilities (1-15)
SEC. 003 CRN 34558 Yu UT Space Institute Campus

Required for the student not otherwise registered during any semester when student uses university facilities and/or faculty time before degree is completed.
Grading Restriction: Satisfactory/No Credit grading only.
Repeatability: May be repeated.
Credit Restriction: May not be used toward degree requirements.
Credit Level Restriction: Graduate credit only.
Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – graduate.


IE 529 Applications of Linear Algebra in Engineering Systems (3)
SEC. 001 CRN 21706 UT Knoxville Campus (Video Recorded)
002 CRN 29392 Distance Education Campus
003 CRN 31827 UT Space Institute Campus
TEXT: Advanced Linear Algebra for Engineers with MATLAB; Sohail A. Dianat and Eli S. Saber;
CRC Press; Latest Edition; ISBN 978-1-4200-9523-4
TIME: Tuesday & Thursday 8:50 – 10:05 E-111
PROF: Dr. Monty Smith

Fundamental concepts of linear algebra to problems in engineering systems: steady state and dynamic systems. Geometric and physical interpretations of relevant concepts: least square problems, LU, QR, and SVD decompositions of system matrix, eigenvalue problems, and similarity transformations in solving difference and differential equations; numerical stability aspects of various algorithms; application of linear algebra concepts in control and optimization studies; introduction to linear programming. Computer projects.

Methods of linear algebra with application to engineering problems. Systems of linear equations: matrix-vector notation, solutions to linear equations, matrix determinants, matrix inversion, Cramer’s rule, LU matrix decomposition. Vector spaces: spanning sets, vector norms, orthogonality, QR matrix decomposition, linear transformations. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors: characteristic polynomials, modal matrices, singular value decomposition. The Cayley-Hamilton theorem: matrix polynomials, functions of matrices, solutions to systems of differential and difference equations. Optimization: least-squares and weighted least-squares methods.

Cross-listed: (Same as Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering 529; Civil Engineering 529, Electrical and Computer Engineering 529; Environmental Engineering 529; Materials Science and Engineering 529; Mechanical Engineering 529; Nuclear Engineering 529).
Comment(s): Graduate standing or consent of instructor required.


IE 534 Financial Management for Engineering Managers (3)
SEC. 001 CRN 33673 UT Knoxville Campus
002 CRN 33674 Distance Education Campus
003 CRN 33675 UT Space Institute Campus
TEXT: TBD
TIME: Monday 10:00 – 12:30 E-113
PROF: Dr. Andrew Yu

Financial and managerial accounting in engineering and technology management. Transaction recording, financial statements, ratios and analysis, activity-based accounting, and standard practices for costing, budgeting, assessment, and control.


IE 539 Strategic Management in Technical Organization (3)
SEC. 001 CRN 33679 UT Knoxville Campus
002 CRN 33681 Distance Education Campus
003 CRN 33682 UT Space Institute Campus
TEXT: TBD
TIME: TBD
PROF: Dr. Lynn Reed

Strategic planning process and strategic management in practice; corporate vision and mission; product, market, organizational, and financial strategies; external factors; commercialization of new technologies; and competition and beyond.
Recommended Background: Graduate standing in Engineering or Business.


IE 542 Design of Experiments for Engineering Managers (3)
SEC. 001 CRN 33684 UT Knoxville Campus
002 CRN 33686 Distance Education Campus
003 CRN 33687 UT Space Institute Campus
TEXT: TBD
TIME: Wednesday 9:30 – 12:00 E-113
PROF: Dr. Tony Shi

Methodology for experiments in product, service, and process improvements. Factorial experiments, screening designs, variance reduction, and other selected topics for engineering managers. Taguchi philosophy and concepts. Optimization and response surface methods. Case studies.
(RE) Prerequisite(s): Industrial Engineering 516.


IE 600 Doctoral Research/Dissertation (3-15)
SEC. 010 CRN 21719 Simonton UT Space Institute Campus
019 CRN 32801 Simonton Distance Education Campus
011 CRN 25079 Yu UT Space Institute Campus
018 CRN 32800 Yu Distance Education Campus
009 CRN 21718 Shi UT Space Institute Campus

Grading Restriction: P/NP only.
Repeatability: May be repeated.
Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – graduate.


MATHEMATICS

 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

ME 500 Master’s Thesis (1-15)
SEC. 001 CRN 21580 Abedi
021 CRN 21600 Kreth
022 CRN 21601 Moeller
023 CRN 21602 Schmisseur
024 CRN 21603 Zhang

Grading Restriction: P/NP only.
Repeatability: May be repeated.
Credit Level Restriction: Graduate credit only.
Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – graduate.


ME 502 Registration for Use of Facilities (1-15)
SEC. 002 CRN 25081 Moeller

Required for the student not otherwise registered during any semester when student uses university facilities and/or faculty time before degree is completed.
Grading Restriction: Satisfactory/No Credit grading only.
Repeatability: May be repeated.
Credit Restriction: May not be used toward degree requirements.
Credit Level Restriction: Graduate credit only.
Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – graduate.


ME 512 Convection Heat Transfer (3)
SEC. 001 CRN 21616
TEXT: Adrian Bejan; Convection Heat Transfer; 4th Edition; John Wiley
TIME: Monday & Wednesday 2:45 – 4:00 Zoom
PROF: Dr. Feng Yuan Zhang

Models and equations for fluid motion, the general energy equation, and transport properties. Exact, approximate, and boundary layer solutions for laminar flow heat transfer problems. Heat transfer in internal and external forced and buoyancy driven flows. Application of similarity concepts and analogies to convection heat transfer.
Recommended Background: Undergraduate heat transfer course.


ME 516 Data Measurement and Analysis (3)
SEC. 001 CRN 34868 (Same as AE 516 001 CRN 34284)
TEXT: Random Data: Analysis and Measurement Procedures; Julius S. Bendat and Allan G. Piersol;
Wiley; 4th Ed.; ISBN 978-0-470-24877-5
TIME: Monday & Wednesday 8:50 – 10:05 E-111
PROF: Dr. Phil Kreth

Various tools and techniques used in the analysis of random data. Data classification; statistics and probability; spectral and correlation functions; data acquisition fundamentals; input-output system models; and an introduction to modern data analysis procedures.
Cross-listed: (Same as: Aerospace Engineering 516.)
(DE) Prerequisite(s): Undergrad degree in engineering. Consent of instructor.
Recommended Background: Logic-based programming knowledge (preferably within MATLAB) and some laboratory research.


ME 522 Thermodynamics II (3)
SEC. 001 CRN 21618
TEXT: Introduction to Physical Gas Dynamics; Walter G. Vincenti and Charles H. Kruger;
Krieger Publishing Company; 2nd, 1975, 1986, 2002 reprint; ISBN 0882753096
TIME: Tuesday & Thursday 10:30 – 11:45 Online
PROF: Dr. Peng Zhao

Macroscopic thermodynamics, including First and Second Law analyses, availability, phase and chemical equilibrium criteria, combustion, gas mixtures, and property relations, determination of thermodynamic properties from molecular structure, spectroscopic data, kinetic theory, statistical mechanics, quantum physics, Schroedinger equation.
Recommended Background: Undergraduate thermodynamics


ME 529 Applications of Linear Algebra in Engineering Systems (3)
SEC. 001 CRN 21620 (Video Recorded)
TEXT: Advanced Linear Algebra for Engineers with MATLAB; Sohail A. Dianat and Eli S. Saber;
CRC Press; Latest Edition; ISBN 978-1-4200-9523-4
TIME: Tuesday & Thursday 8:50 – 10:05 E-111
PROF: Dr. Monty Smith

Fundamental concepts of linear algebra to problems in engineering systems: steady state and dynamic systems. Geometric and physical interpretations of relevant concepts: least square problems, LU, QR, and SVD decompositions of system matrix, eigenvalue problems, and similarity transformations in solving difference and differential equations; numerical stability aspects of various algorithms; application of linear algebra concepts in control and optimization studies; introduction to linear programming. Computer projects.

Methods of linear algebra with application to engineering problems. Systems of linear equations: matrix-vector notation, solutions to linear equations, matrix determinants, matrix inversion, Cramer’s rule, LU matrix decomposition. Vector spaces: spanning sets, vector norms, orthogonality, QR matrix decomposition, linear transformations. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors: characteristic polynomials, modal matrices, singular value decomposition. The Cayley-Hamilton theorem: matrix polynomials, functions of matrices, solutions to systems of differential and difference equations. Optimization: least-squares and weighted least-squares methods

Cross-listed: (Same as Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering 529; Civil Engineering 529, Electrical and Computer Engineering 529; Environmental Engineering 529; Industrial Engineering 529; Materials Science and Engineering 529; Nuclear Engineering 529).
Comment(s): Graduate standing or consent of instructor required.


ME 569 Principles of Additive Manufacturing (3)
SEC. 002 CRN 33422
TEXT: TBD
TIME: Tuesday & Thursday 8:50 – 10:05 Online
PROF: Dr. Sudarsanam Babu

Fundamentals of additive manufacturing processes within the context of traditional manufacturing life cycle including the basics of product design, processing mechanics and materials science to highlight the advantages of additive manufacturing.
Credit Restriction: Students cannot receive credit for both 469 and 569.
Recommended Background: Computer-aided design, materials science.
Registration Permission: Consent of Instructor.


ME 570 Numerical Methods for Engineering (3)
SEC. 001 CRN 28707
TEXT: TBD
TIME: Tuesday & Thursday 8:50 – 10:05 E-110
PROF: Dr. Kivanc Ekici

Review and implementation of basic numerical techniques. Explicit and implicit solution techniques of ordinary differential equations and partial differential equations. Applications include heat transfer and fluid mechanics.
Recommended Background: Numerical analysis, fluid mechanics, heat transfer and differential equations.
Registration Permission: Consent of Instructor.


ME 590 Selected Engineering Problems (2-6)
SEC. 002 CRN 21626 Abedi
003 CRN 25514 Kreth
005 CRN 25515 Moeller
006 CRN 25516 Schmisseur
007 CRN 25517 Zhang

Grading Restriction: Satisfactory/No Credit grading only.
Repeatability: May be repeated. Maximum 6 hours.
Comment(s): Enrollment limited to students in problems option.
Registration Permission: Consent of advisor.


ME 599 Special Topics: Aerospace Ground Test Simulations and Facilities (3)
SEC. 002 CRN 26621 (Same as AE 599 001 CRN 23969)
TEXT: No Textbook – Instructor Notes Only
TIME: Monday & Wednesday 10:30 – 11:45 E-111
PROF: Dr. Milt Davis

• Provide a Fundamental Understanding of Aerospace Ground Test Simulation and Facilities
• How Ground Testing Provides Accurate Engineering Information
• Application of GT Information to Aerospace System
• Applicable Analysis Techniques
• Suitable Measurement Systems
Repeatability: May be repeated. Maximum 6 hours.
Registration Permission: Consent of instructor.


ME 599 Hypersonic Airbreathing Propulsion (3)
SEC. 005 CRN 26679
TEXT: TBD
TIME: Tuesday & Thursday 8:50 – 10:05 Online
PROF: Dr. Damiano Baccarella

Repeatability: May be repeated. Maximum 6 hours.
Registration Permission: Consent of instructor.


ME 599 Special Topics: Introduction to Uncertainty Quantification (3)
SEC. 006 CRN 25765 (Same as AE 599 005 CRN 25163)
TEXT: Measurement Uncertainty, Methods and Applications; Ronald Dieck; International Society of Automation; 5th Edition; ISBN-10 1941546943, ISBN-13 978-1941546949
TIME: Tuesday & Thursday 10:30 – 11:45 E-110
PROF: Dr. Ragini Acharya

With the increasing complexity and more demanding requirements for engineered systems, it has become vital to include Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) in engineering analysis. This course will cover uncertainty identification and quantification arising from sources like measurement inaccuracies, material properties, boundary and initial conditions, and modeling approximations, numerical errors in the computational fluid dynamics based workflow including validation with experimental data, introduces forward and inverse propagation of uncertainty and uncertainty quantification methods, discuss potential implementations on use case studies to demonstrate the benefits of going beyond deterministic analysis.
The competitive benefits of UQ include reduced development time and cost, improved designs, better understanding of risk, and quantifiable confidence in analysis results and engineering decisions. Unfortunately, there are obstacles and technical challenges which can prevent organizations from utilizing UQ methods and techniques in their engineering practice. This graduate course will enable students to be prepared for these technical challenges.
Repeatability: May be repeated. Maximum 6 hours.
Registration Permission: Consent of instructor.


ME 599 Special Topics: Combustion II – Combustion and Propulsion (3)
SEC. 013 CRN 27651 (Same as AE 599 003 CRN 26620)
TEXT: Stabilization and Dynamics of Premixed Swirling Flames; 1st Edition; Paul Palies;
July 2020; Available electronically at the library.
TIME: Tuesday & Thursday 10:30 – 11:45 E-113
PROF: Dr. Paul Palies

This course follows Combustion I course and focuses on combustion dynamics and unsteady combustion process in gas turbine engines for commercial aviation. The goal is to describe the fundamentals of combustion processes at work in these propulsion systems including turbulent combustion and combustion instability. A major emphasis is on flame stabilization and combustion dynamics. Flame stabilization includes non-reacting flow processes and chemical reactions complexities associated to the flame front which are described. Combustion dynamics include phenomenon such as flashback, combustion oscillation, and blowoff. Elements of analytical, computational modeling and experimental measurements in the field are introduced and discussed. The operation and principles of gas turbines engines are also described. Finally, the perspective for research and development are outlined and include clean propulsion, sustainable aviation fuel, premixed combustion, and hydrogen combustion. Some of the material presented and this course are also relevant to other combustion and propulsion systems and specifics (fighter aircraft and rocket engines…) and will be discussed too.
This is a three-credit hour course. Combustion I is recommended, but not required.
Repeatability: May be repeated. Maximum 6 hours
Registration Permission: Consent of instructor.


ME 599 Special Topics: Mathematical Methods in Physics I (3)
SEC. 015 CRN 28672 (Same as BME 599 005 CRN 25957 and AE 599 006 CRN 24962)
TEXT: Mathematical Methods for Physicists; Arfken et al; Academic Press; 2013
TIME: TBD
PROF: Dr. Christian Parigger

Linear vector spaces, matrices, tensors, curvilinear coordinates, functions of a complex variable, partial differential equations and boundary value problems, Green’s functions, integral transforms, integral equations, spherical harmonics, Bessel functions, calculus of variations.
Recommended Background: Advanced calculus and differential equations.
Repeatability: May be repeated. Maximum 6 hours.
Registration Permission: Consent of instructor.


ME 600 Doctoral Research/Dissertation (3-15)
SEC. 015 CRN 21645 Abedi
016 CRN 21646 Kreth
018 CRN 21648 Moeller
019 CRN 21649 Schmisseur
027 CRN 21657 Zhang

Grading Restriction: P/NP only.
Repeatability: May be repeated.
Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – graduate.


ME 601 Doctoral Research Methodology (3)
SEC. 002 CRN 28553
TEXT: TBD
TIME: TBD
PROF: Dr. Jeffrey Reinbolt

Methods of planning and conducting original research and proposal writing.
Grading Restriction: Satisfactory/No Credit grading only.
Repeatability: Maximum 6 hours. May be repeated once.
Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – doctoral student.
Registration Permission: Departmental approval.

PHYSICS

Phys 541 Electromagnetic Theory (3)
SEC. 002 CRN 24775
TEXT: Electrodynamics; Chaichian et al; Springer; 2016
TIME: Monday, Wednesday & Friday 9:30 – 10:20 Zoom
PROF: Dr. Christian Parigger

Review of electrostatics, magnetostatics, and quasi-static problems; Maxwell’s field equations and their solutions in dielectric and conducting media; electrodynamics and relativity, retarded potentials and gauge transformations, radiation produced by accelerating charges.
(DE) Prerequisite(s): 571.